Jon Oliver on Net Neutrality

@robdelaney This made me feel #moist, with a slight stirring in my #beefbustle. #bigdinklage

@robdelaney This made me feel #moist, with a slight stirring in my #beefbustle. #bigdinklage

todayinhistory:

May 29th 1953: Hillary and Norgay reach Everest summit

On this day in 1953, Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay become the first people to reach the summit of the world’s highest mountain: Mount Everest. Many previous attempts to scale the peak had failed, but New Zealander Hillary and Nepalese Norgay reached the top (29,028 feet) at 11.30am local time on May 29th 1953. Norgay later revealed that Hillary had been the first to step onto the summit. The pair spent only 15 minutes taking pictures at the summit before they began their descent. Norgay left chocolates in the snow as an offering and Hillary left a cross that he had been given by John Hunt (leader of the expedition). News of their success reached London on the morning of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation on June 2nd and upon arrival in Kathmandu Hillary and Hunt discovered they had been knighted.

(via pbsthisdayinhistory)

North Church, Portsmouth, NH

North Church, Portsmouth, NH

cracked:

Has any movie pushed us to like the wrong protagonist more than Ferris Bueller’s Day Off? Ferris is the guy with his name on a water tower and Wrigley Field and everybody’s lips. He’s far from needing saving. As we’ve argued before, Cameron is the real hero of the movie and the one in need of help to make the most of his newfound lack of depression. That’s why this design from Daniel F. celebrates the guy who isn’t a smug magic asshole for 102 minutes, and who’s turned his own life upside down due to the ageless charms of a manic Matthew Broderick. [GET IT HERE]

cracked:

Has any movie pushed us to like the wrong protagonist more than Ferris Bueller’s Day Off? Ferris is the guy with his name on a water tower and Wrigley Field and everybody’s lips. He’s far from needing saving. As we’ve argued before, Cameron is the real hero of the movie and the one in need of help to make the most of his newfound lack of depression. That’s why this design from Daniel F. celebrates the guy who isn’t a smug magic asshole for 102 minutes, and who’s turned his own life upside down due to the ageless charms of a manic Matthew Broderick. [GET IT HERE]

(Source: robdelaney)

As of this Saturday, February 22nd, eight years will have passed since Clarence Thomas last asked a question during a Supreme Court oral argument. His behavior on the bench has gone from curious to bizarre to downright embarrassing, for himself and for the institution he represents.

There’s a reason the phrase “your day in court” resonates. It is an indispensable part of the legal system.

But the process works only if the Justices engage. The current Supreme Court is almost too ready to do so, and sometimes lawyers have a hard time getting a word in edgewise. In question-and-answer sessions at law schools, Thomas has said that his colleagues talk too much, that he wants to let the lawyers say their piece, and that the briefs tell him all he needs to know. But this—as his colleagues’ ability to provoke revealing exchanges demonstrates—is nonsense. Thomas is simply not doing his job.

By refusing to acknowledge the advocates or his fellow-Justices, Thomas treats them all with disrespect. It would be one thing if Thomas’s petulance reflected badly only on himself, which it did for the first few years of his ludicrous behavior. But at this point, eight years on, Thomas is demeaning the Court. Imagine, for a moment, if all nine Justices behaved as Thomas does on the bench. The public would rightly, and immediately, lose all faith in the Supreme Court. Instead, the public has lost, and should lose, any confidence it might have in Clarence Thomas.

David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen Talk Control and Spontaneity in Their Films

But the story model doesn’t succeed here, because Elmi can’t fill the Talented Jerk’s shoes. He wobbled through most of the competition, narrowly escaped elimination a few times, occasionally behaved like a dick, and sent someone else home for his crappy dish. In his final service, Elmi characteristically under-seasons, serves unchewable meat, and berates servers loud enough for diners to hear it. Still, Colicchio backs Elmi emphatically, and when his stumping is juxtaposed with the rest of Nick’s edit, it reads as though Colicchio decided Elmi should be Top Chef and overruled the other judges. It’s a result that lacks the basic ring of fairness, especially given the optics of a white male winning over two women of color (Compton and second runner-up Shirley Chung) who spent the season steamrolling him.